Tag Archives: The Traveling Adjunct

The Traveling Adjunct–Sept. 21, 2018

Get Away to Nantucket

lighthouse with boat in water in backgroundNantucket.  The name makes you think of grey shingled cottages with white trim and overflowing flower boxes.  I’ve visited a number of times over the years, and it’s always just as beautiful.  While Nantucket is a great day trip, it’s also a great weekend trip and I recently returned for a quick getaway.  Here’s where we stayed and what we did–

If you’re not familiar with Nantucket, here are some quick facts:

It’s the boomerang-shaped island off of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. It’s 14 miles (20 km) long and 3 – 5 miles (2-3 km) wide.

The year-round population is around 11,000, but during the summer, the population swells to somewhere between 50,000-60,000! Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–Aug. 31, 2018

See Seattle in 12 Hours

This summer, my husband and I road-tripped from Seattle to Montana. We flew into Seattle and ended our trip with a (very) short visit to the city, so our time was limited to about 12 hours (Yikes!).  It was a beautiful day in Seattle, so we decided to go for a stroll.

Here’s what we did and other things we would have like to have done!

But first, a few Seattle tidbits…  

While we may all know Seattle as the birthplace of grunge music or Jimi Hendrix, here are some things about Seattle you might not know.

Where is it? 

Seattle lies between Puget Sound and Lake Washington. To the west is the Olympic Mountain range and to the east are the Cascade Mountains. It covers about 142.5 square miles (wow!) and as of 2016, Seattle’s population was 704,352 Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–July 26, 2018

 Road Trip:  Historic Wallace, Idaho

old boat

I’m continuing with my summer road trip series in the Traveling Adjunct this month with a stop in northern Idaho.  Specifically, Wallace, Idaho.  How did I decide to visit Wallace?  I read about it in a news article and since it was along our drive between Coeur d’Alene, Idaho and Whitefish, Montana, I thought it would make a fun stop. It didn’t disappoint so here we go! Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–June 28, 2018

Road Trip:  Spokane

sculpture in grass

Welcome back to another edition of the Traveling Adjunct! This month’s post is the first in a series about the fun and unique places I visited on my summer vacation! For our trip this year, my husband and I decided to go to Montana. Montana?  Isn’t this post about Spokane, Washington? Yeah, but like most of our trips, this one “evolved” into an awesome road trip taking us through the states of Washington, Idaho and Montana, covering 1,400 miles. This month’s Traveling Adjunct is on our afternoon in Spokane. So fasten your seatbelts and let’s get going! Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–May 25, 2018

A weekend in the Finger Lakes

countryside with lake

Welcome back to another edition of the Traveling Adjunct!  Well, the semester is over and that means time to think about a getaway! Many people may think of the Finger Lakes of New York as strictly a wine region, but there’s so much to do in addition to wine tasting, like kayaking and cycling! So, for this edition of the Traveling Adjunct, I’m writing about my recent outdoorsy trip to “FL” – where I stayed, where I ate and discounts I scooped up! Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–April 20, 2018

10 Things to know about the Azores

Welcome to another edition of the Traveling Adjunct! I spent an amazing week in the Azores! And if you’re thinking of going, here are 10 things to know before you go!

But first, a bit about the Azores:

It’s an archipelago of nine volcanic islands in the North Atlantic Ocean, located about 1,000 miles off the coast of Portugal and about 935 miles off the coast of Morocco. The official name is the Autonomous Region of the Azores and it’s part of Portugal. You’ll also see the Portuguese name written – Açores.

The nine islands are Flores, Corvo, Graciosa, Terceira, São Jorge, Pico, Faial, São Miguel, Santa Maria and the islands’ volcanic beginnings are apparent everywhere, from the landscape to the lava stone fences Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–March 23, 2018

6 Awesome Places in the U.S. to See “Spring” Flowers!
Welcome back to another edition of the Traveling Adjunct! With the recent storms in our area, we’re all probably ready for spring to be here and to see flowers instead of snow!  And while spring will be here soon enough (we hope!), did you know that starting as early as February and going through August, there are so many places to see flowers in bloom throughout the States? Here are just six! Enjoy!

Washington, D.C.

flowers in bouquets

This year, the 2018 National Cherry Blossom Festival will be held March 20 through April 15.  The website even has a “watch page” dedicated to tracking the progress of the cherry blossoms! The festival includes the Blossom Kite Festival, a parade and a party known as “PetalPalooza.”  For all the festival details, including where to stay, and even how climate change is affecting cherry blossoms, go to the link!

 

California

Carlsbad:  What began as horticulturalist Luther Gage ’s simple flower plantings nearly 100 years ago, has developed into the Flower Fields at Carlsbad Ranch. Located in San Diego County, the Flower Fields is a working ranch and as well as a tourist attraction. This year, it will be open from March 1 through May 13, 2018. So, what types of flowers grow here?  The ranunculus – it’s in the buttercup family and is actually native to Asia Minor. Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–Feb. 16, 2018

Greeting Each Other with the Right Number of Kisses… in France!

wine corks in a heart Since we just celebrated Valentine’s Day, I thought I’d write about an issue that baffled me when I lived in France–  how many kisses you’re supposed to give someone when greeting them.

Living in France was awesome! And while I was able to conquer the French language (mostly), one of the great mysteries of my time living there was how many kisses you’re supposed to give when greeting someone– 2, 3, 4?  What happens if you give someone the wrong number of kisses? Are you banished to smooch purgatory? Which cheek do you start with– the right or the left?  And how did all this kissing come about anyway?  It was way more confusing to me than learning the language!

A few years ago, I came across a chart in a French newspaper, called “Combien de Bises.”  In English, that means “how many kisses.” Why didn’t someone think of this before!?! The chart breaks down the number of kisses given…by department! Uh, department?  Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–Jan. 19, 2018

Travel Stories of 2017

With 2018 here, I thought now would be a good time to reflect on some of the big travel stories we heard about in 2017 and what’s coming up in 2018!

maps

 The 747 Retires

As a former flight attendant, I’m nostalgic for the end of an era. I mention this first since the 747 has had such a huge impact on commercial flight. Not only could it carry more passengers, but it could also fly farther and more efficiently than other aircraft. In 1970, the 747 began flying commercially (Pan Am christened its first 747 at Dulles International Airport). The “hump” always made the 747 one of the most recognizable planes. It’s carried more than 3.5 billion passengers over the years, with more than 400+ passengers per flight. In November of last year, United’s 747 made its last flight. And Delta flew its last 747 commercially in December. Continue reading

The Traveling Adjunct–Dec. 15, 2017

48 Hours in Iceland

waterfall

Aah, Iceland…. This cool island is very hot right now, but when I visited the first time in 2000, people thought I was crazy.  It was “so off-the-beaten-path,” and where exactly was it anyway?  Nowadays, travelers are beating a path just to get there.  Last year alone, the country had 325,000 American visitors and about 1.3 million from across the globe!  The entire Icelandic population is only 332,000!  Well, we returned for a quick 48-hour visit, so here’s where we stayed, what we did and how we got around!

$$Warning$$:  Don’t be misled thinking that Iceland is a “budget” destination. It was expensive in 2000, and it is (in my opinion) even more expensive now.  I’m not saying it’s not worth it, I’m just saying, be prepared. As an example, two takeout sandwiches were about $25! Continue reading