Monthly Archives: April 2019

Atlantic City Campus Celebrates Earth Day

Worthington Campus celebrated Earth Day on Monday April 22, 2019. Students were treated to peat pots with flower seeds made by The Cross Cultural Club. Additionally, club members Najmin Kalam and Amna Malik offered Mehndi hand painting designs. Alexis Demitroff, Public Education and Outreach Assistant from ACUA provided students with materials and information for recycling. Eileen Curristine, Chief Officer, HR, Public Safety & Compliance presented students with informative handouts regarding storm water pollution prevention. SGA provided giveaways that consisted of: Earth stress balls and key-chains, Earth recycle bookmarks and book bags.

Thanks to all the club volunteers and Club Advisors, Shirley Shields and Michael Kammer, ESL Professors for all their hard work in making the day a huge success. A gigantic thank you to Caesar Niglio, Master Technician for providing pretzels and Rita’s water ice donated by the ACCCEA and Cynthia Correa, Director of Student Services Worthington and Institutional Career Services , Bibi Asma, Student Services work-study student for handing them out.

The Traveling Adjunct – 12 of the Most Remote Places on Earth (Part 2)

For all of you who think the world is really small, this is post is for you! Last month in the Traveling Adjunct, I posted Part 1, this month, I’m covering six more remote places on the planet – Enjoy!

  7. McMurdo Station, Antarctica

A friend of mine was stationed at McMurdo when he was in the military and he took this photo in Antarctica. McMurdo is actually a research station and it’s operated by the United States, although technically, McMurdo is in the New Zealand part of Antarctica called the Ross Dependency. You’ll probably only go to McMurdo if you’re a scientist or in the military, but if you’re wondering how you get there…Uh, well you take a ski plane. Yup, that’s right, a plane equipped with skis – Crazy!

 

Antarctica 1985

8. Coober Pedy, Australia

I know Coober Pedy from a movie called, “The Adventures of Prescilla Queen of the Desert”, but Cooper Pedy is really known for being the “opal capital of the world.” Opals were first discovered in the outback town around 1915 and Cooper Pedy still relies on opal mining (and tourism – it gets around 150,000 tourists every year). Roughly 525 miles from Adelaide, Cooper Pedy has just over 1,700 residents.

9. Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland

Ittoqqortoormiit is fairly young, having only been founded in 1925. Formerly named Scoresbysund, after the English Arctic explorer and whaler William Scoresby, it was later renamed “Ittoqqortoormiit” which is Greenlandic for “Big-House Dwellers”. As far as remote, Ittoqqortoormiit is about as remote as you can get, even for Greenland (and that’s saying something)! There aren’t many people there – only 450! And, to get to the town, you have to take a helicopter…from the airport! So, what’s there to do? Well, there are the Northern Lights, of course!

10. Oymyakon, Russia

Just a few hundred miles from the Arctic Circle in Siberia is Oymaykon, Russia. It’s the record holder for recording the coldest temperature ever -90 ! Yes you read that right NEGATIVE 90 degrees!  No. Thank. You. I mean, how do you even stay warm? Still, about 500 hard core people do live there. The most insane part – in winter, people just leave their cars running 24/7!

11. Changtang, Tibet

Changtang is in the high altitude Tibetan Plateau between 2.5 to 4 miles above sea level. Where the heck is that? Well, that would be in western and northern Tibet. The Changpa, the nomadic people of Changtang, rely on livestock for survival – not only for food, but also for their livelihood. Today, most of Changtang is protected nature reserves consisting of the Chang Tang Nature Reserve, the second-largest nature reserve in the world.

12. Socotra Island, Yemen

Sometimes called Soqotra, 37% of Socotra’s plant and animal species aren’t found anywhere on earth.  Socotra Island has been described as “the most alien-looking place on Earth” and was actually designated as a UNESCO world natural heritage site in 2008. The island is about 82 miles long and 31 miles wide and the thing I found interesting was that 145,000 people also live on the island!

Have you been to any of the places we’ve talked about over the last two posts?

Tina Vignali is an English as a Second Language adjunct at the Charles D. Worthington Atlantic City Campus. She writes a monthly travel-themed column for the CommuniCator. You can follow her trips around the block and journeys around the world in her travel blog Traveleidoscope.com.  Psst! You can also visit Traveleidoscope on Instagram,  Facebook and Twitter!  And guess what – she’s now a member of the North American Travel Journalists Association!

 

Media Productions Clubs Hosts Spring Gala

The Media Productions Spring Gala organized by the Media Productions Club (President Autumn Vasquez, Advisor Bo Zilovic) took place Friday, April 12th 2019. The Gala hosted around 90 students and their parents, the event featured a dinner party in the student cafeteria and a showcase of students work at the Walter Edge’s Theater.  The showcase included digital and traditional artifacts such as film, animation, digital design, oil on canvas paintings, written word and more.

Many student clubs came out to show their support at this event. The Art Club, The Atlantic Cape Review (school newspaper), and Rewrites (literary magazine) were there to showcase the work of their students. 107.9WRML, our student-run radio station live streamed music during the Art gala and dinner portion of the evenings schedule. Atlantic Cape Choir had several live performances during this event.

Dr. Gaba participates in President’s Panel at the 2019 Association of Community Colleges Convention

The AACC annual meeting is among the largest and most dynamic gatherings of educational leaders, attracting over 2,000 community college presidents and senior administrators, as well as international educators, representatives of business/industry and federal agencies. This year, President Gaba participated in several sessions including “Sharing our personal journey to the Presidency”.

When Barbara Gaba was up for the position of president of Atlantic Cape Community College in New Jersey, the board was impressed that she had 40 years of experience in higher education, including stints as provost and associate vice president for academic affairs at Union County College in New Jersey.

Full story here.

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To view the full story visit the Community College Daily Link here: https://www.ccdaily.com/2019/04/want-college-president/

Atlantic County Freeholders recognize National Community College Month

Chairwoman Freeholder Amy Gatto, Vice Chairwoman Maureen Kern and the Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders recognized Atlantic Cape in honor of National Community College Month. They presented Dr. Gaba with proclamations from the Freeholders and County Executive Dennis Levinson which recognized the importance of our institution to the community and to the students we serve.

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Congressman Jeff Van Drew & Senator Bob Andrzejczak visit Cape May Campus

Congressman Jeff Van Drew and Senator Bob Andrzejczak visited our Cape May Campus to speak with students Matthew, Torey and Zhanna about the NJ Community College Opportunity Grant. This Free Community College initiative made it possible for many students to attend Atlantic Cape who thought higher education was out of their reach. Thank you to Congressman Van Drew and Senator Andrzejczak for your time and support!

This event coincided with National Community College Month, which is a time to recognize and spread awareness of the hard work and achievement happening every day on community college campuses. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, there are more than 12 million students enrolled at community colleges across the country, institutions that serve an incredibly diverse student population and put millions of people’s educational and career goals within reach.

Stedman Graham attends Funding Information Network training at Cape May County Campus

On March 28, Stedman Graham joined 25 other workshop attendees for a training on how to use the Funding Information Network. Mr. Graham attended as representative of the nonprofit called Concerned Citizens of Whitesboro. The FIN is an online directory of grant making organizations, institutions and agencies in the United States and around the world. The FIN is available for free to the Atlantic Cape community and the general public. It is located at the Nonprofit Resource Center in the Cape May County Campus library. Periodic workshops are conducted by Resource Development and library staff and individual FIN training sessions can be arranged by appointment.

Janet Hauge, Director of Academic Support Services, oversees activities at all three campus libraries and was instrumental in coordinating the delivery of the FIN workshops. The training was conducted by a Senior Librarian, Susan Shiroma, from the Foundation Center in New York City. She spent two days in Cape May training nonprofit organizations as well as faculty and staff on how to research grant opportunities using the FIN. She also presented workshops on the elements of basic grant proposal writing.

Additionally, Mike Rennick, Senior Manager of Grants, presented the Grants 101 workshop in March 13 to interested Atlantic Cape faculty and staff. Mike’s presentation covers the how the Resource Development Department can assist in the research, development and writing of grant proposals at the college. Mike is available to offer this presentation to other faculty and staff members at department meetings. Please contact Mike directly if you are interested in learning more about the grant development process or researching potential grant opportunities at Atlantic Cape.  Mike can be reached by email at mrennick@atlantic.edu or by phone at x4516.

To schedule individual FIN training sessions please contact Dorothy Pearson, part-time Cape May Campus library. Dottie can be reached at dpearson@atlantic.edu or by emailing FIN@atlantic.edu.

The Nonprofit Resource Center and the FIN are made possible through a generous donation from the Mullock Family.

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Pictured in the photograph from left to right: 

Stedman Graham, Janet Hauge, Susan Shiroma, Maria Kellett and Bob Mullock

– Article by Maria Kellett, Dean, CMCC

Atlantic Cape Students Present Work at the New Jersey Women’s and Gender Studies Consortium

Atlantic Cape students Amanda Brady, Kiera Quade, and Jennifer Johnston (pictured left-right) presented work at the New Jersey Women’s and Gender Studies Consortium Undergraduate Research Colloquium held on March 29 at Stockton University’s Atlantic City campus.

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Amanda presented her research paper on rape culture written for Composition II; Kiera, an explication of trans poet Justice Ameer’s poem “body without the d” written for Introduction to Literature; and Jennifer, a monologue about sexual assault titled “The Time Is Now” written for Creative Writing. Also in attendance were Associate Professor of Social Sciences Heather Boone, Professor of English Effie Russell, and Assistant Professor of English Rich Russell, who moderated the panel on Gender and Genre.

The mission of the New Jersey Women’s and Gender Studies Consortium is “to ensure the continued strength, visibility and development of interdisciplinary women’s and gender studies at universities and colleges in New Jersey.”

Student Support Services Annual Day of Service – 2019

This year, the Student Support Services program sponsored their Annual Day of Service at the Community Food Bank on March 15, 2019.

They were a small group but were told that they were one of the best performing groups they’ve seen by one of the Food Bank’s regular volunteers. They managed to put away almost 70 boxes of food and miscellaneous items in two hours!

 

Cape May Campus Update: Black History Month, Women’s History Month, Career Days & Earth Day

Black History Month
Dr. Tammy DeFranco coordinated a Black History Month Trivia event with moderator, Professor Kim Hall. Students had fun participating while we all learned about educational moments in Black History.
Dr. Tammy DeFranco, wrote and coordinated a Black History Month musical program and worked with Professors Andrew Hink (Music Appreciation) and Lisa Toal (Introduction to Theatre) to provide a documentary and history of Black History Month Role Models. Professor Hink’s class played a wonderful song that he taught his class to play and Professor Helen McCaffrey attended with her class. A big thank you to SGA for their refreshments. Thank you professors, if it wasn’t for your excellent support, we would have not been able to have this wonderful program.
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Women’s History Month
Throughout the month of March, we recognized our “Sheros”, females that made a difference in our lives — our female heroes. Students wrote the name of their Shero (their mother, sister, professor, etc.) on the board in their honor.
Dr. Tammy DeFranco, interviewed a few female professors (Lenora Sheppard, Linda Koch, Helen McCaffrey, and Susan Van Rossum) on their career paths. Students got to hear about the different career paths and how they chose that direction as well as any obstacles they had to overcome, and provided excellent study advice. Students were able to connect to their professors and see that they too, experienced many of the same encounters.
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Career Development Days
Dr. Tammy DeFranco, developed, coordinated, and presented Career Development days for 170 eighth graders from Lower, Wildwood, Dennis, and Middle schools. The students were wowed by speakers and career workshop presenters, Paula Davis (Dean of Students), Maria Kellett (Dean of Cape May and Resources), Donna Vassallo (Dean of WACC), Cynthia Correa (Director Career Services), Anisha Chhotalal (Registration Assistant), Professor’s Karl Guilian and Michelle Blumberg, Michael Barnes (Director of Center for Accessibility), Victor Moreno (Admissions Recruiter), Jessica Brown (E.O.F. Recruiter/Career Specialist), April Wolff (IT), Continuing Education.  Students had a wonderful time and learned so much about our college and the first steps of their career path. Many students said they are going to make Atlantic Cape their community college.  Thank you everyone for your support in this exciting program.

Earth Day

Dr. Tammy DeFranco developed and coordinated an interactive Earth Day Program where students learned valuable environmental information on composting, planting flowers to help with the bee and butterfly population. The Cape May Zoo provided “Annie” the Armadillo and “Susie” the python snake and informed students how important it is to keep our environment clean so their environment will thrive. Students had the opportunity to paint birdhouses, and other crafts they could start their environmentally safe garden with the free seeds they were given. Students also learned about the solutions to Stormwater Pollution (thank you to Eileen Curristine, Chief Officer Human Resources & Public Safety & Compliance) for this information. Thank you to April Wolff (IT) for providing “Sounds of Nature” music and pictures of the environment for students to see what a beautiful world we have and how to preserve it. A big thank you to the ACCCEA for the pretzels and water ice and to S.G.A. for the pizza and soda, the students loved everything and were so grateful for the goodies.
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